Quid pro quo harassment is a form of sexual harassment in which a person in a position of power or authority demands sexual favors in exchange for something else, such as a job, a promotion, or a good grade. This type of harassment can be very damaging to the victim, both emotionally and professionally.

Here are the 13 powerful resources for victims of quid pro quo harassment:

  1. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC)
  2. Office of Civil Rights (OCR)
  3. Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network (RAINN)
  4. U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ)
  5. The National Center for Victims of Crime (NCVC)
  6. The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU)
  7. The National Employment Lawyers Association (NELA)
  8. The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM)
  9. The Association of Workplace Investigators (AWI)
  10. The National Employment Law Project (NELP)
  11. The Equal Rights Advocates (ERA)
  12. The Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC)
  13. Your Local Legal Aid organization

Now, let’s discuss these resources for victims of quid pro quo harassment in detail.

Table of Contents

I. Resources for Victims of Quid Pro Quo Harassment

1. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC)

Introduction to the EEOC

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) is a vital resource for victims of quid pro quo harassment, offering a range of services to support individuals who have been subjected to this form of workplace discrimination. Here’s a more detailed explanation of the EEOC’s role and how it can assist victims:

a) How the EEOC Can Help

  • File a complaint online or by calling 1-800-669-4000.
  • The EEOC will investigate the complaint and try to settle the charge.
  • If a settlement is unsuccessful, the EEOC can file a lawsuit to protect your rights.
  • The EEOC website offers information on what constitutes sexual harassment, how to file a complaint, and what to expect after filing a complaint.
  • EEOC field offices provide information and guidance and help connect victims with other resources.
  • The EEOC can help you understand your legal rights and options.
  • The EEOC can provide legal representation in court.
  • The EEOC can help you connect with other victims of quid pro quo harassment.
  • The EEOC can advocate for changes to laws and policies that protect harassment victims.
  • The EEOC is confidential, and your identity will not be disclosed.

b) Contact Information

To learn more about the EEOC’s services or to file a complaint, please visit the EEOC’s website or call 1-800-669-4000.

Website URL: https://www.eeoc.gov/

2. Office of Civil Rights (OCR)

Office of Civil Rights (OCR) Complaints

The Office for Civil Rights (OCR) is a U.S. Department of Education division that enforces federal civil rights laws in schools and colleges. The OCR’s mission is to ensure that all students have equal educational opportunities, regardless of race, color, national origin, sex, disability, or age.

a) How the OCR Can Help Victims of Quid Pro Quo Harassment in Educational Settings

  • Investigate complaints: The OCR investigates complaints of discrimination, including sexual harassment, in educational programs or activities that receive federal funds.
  • Enforce civil rights laws: The OCR enforces Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, which prohibits sex discrimination in education.
  • Resources: The OCR provides various resources for students, parents, and educators to prevent and address sexual harassment in schools.
  • Offer training: The OCR offers training and technical assistance to schools on complying with Title IX and creating a safe and nondiscriminatory learning environment.
  • Pursue enforcement action: If the OCR finds that a school has violated Title IX, it can take enforcement action, including requiring the school to change its policies or practices, providing financial compensation to victims, or seeking court action.
  • Protect students’ rights: The OCR works to protect the rights of all students to learn in a safe and nondiscriminatory environment, regardless of their sex, gender identity, or sexual orientation.
  • Empower students: The OCR encourages students to report incidents of sexual harassment and provides information on how to file a complaint.
  • Collaborate with schools: The OCR works to develop and implement effective Title IX policies and procedures.
  • Promote prevention: The OCR promotes sexual harassment prevention through education and training.
  • Ensure accountability: The OCR holds schools accountable for complying with Title IX and protecting students from sexual harassment.

b) Contact Information

To learn more about the OCR’s services or to file a complaint, please visit the OCR’s website or call 1-800-USA-LEARN (1-800-872-5327).

Website URL: https://ocrportal.hhs.gov/

3. Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network (RAINN)

All The Difference: How RAINN Helps Survivors

RAINN is the nation’s largest anti-sexual violence organization. RAINN provides a variety of services to victims of sexual violence, including sexual harassment and their loved ones.

a) How RAINN Can Help Victims of Quid Pro Quo Harassment

RAINN provides confidential support, connects victims with resources, and helps them cope with the emotional aftermath of harassment. RAINN also promotes prevention, advocates for victims’ rights, supports law enforcement, conducts research, provides training, and raises public awareness.

b) Contact Information

Victims of quid pro quo harassment can call RAINN at 1-800-656-HOPE (4673) or chat with a RAINN support specialist online for confidential support. RAINN’s hotline is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year. RAINN’s online chat service is available from 3 pm to 10 pm CT, seven days a week.

Website URL: https://www.rainn.org

4. U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ)

U_S_ Department of Justice (DOJ) - Resources for Victims of Quid Pro Quo Harassment - Free Image From Flickr_com
U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) – Resources for Victims of Quid Pro Quo Harassment – Free Image From Flickr.com (Common Creative Licence)

The U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) is the principal federal law enforcement agency in the United States and one of the oldest executive departments of the U.S. government. The DOJ is responsible for enforcing federal laws, investigating crimes, and representing the federal government in civil and criminal cases. It also provides a variety of services to crime victims, including victims of quid pro quo harassment.

a) How the DOJ Can Help Victims of Quid Pro Quo Harassment that is also a Crime

The DOJ can investigate, prosecute, and support victims of quid pro quo harassment, which is also a crime. It can also file civil rights lawsuits, enforce hate crime laws, advocate for victims’ rights, and work with other agencies to address this issue. Additionally, the DOJ promotes education, training, and prevention strategies to combat harassment and hold offenders accountable.

Here’s what the DOJ says about how it can help victims of crime:

  • Investigate, prosecute, and support victims of crimes
  • File civil rights lawsuits
  • Enforce hate crime laws
  • Advocate for victims’ rights
  • Work with other agencies to address crime

b) Contact Information

To learn more about the DOJ’s services or to file a complaint, please visit the DOJ’s website or call 1-800-CALL-FBI (1-800-225-5324).

Website URL: https://www.justice.gov/

Quid Pro Quo and Hostile Work Environment

5. The National Center for Victims of Crime (NCVC)

NCVC Membership

The National Center for Victims of Crime (NCVC) is a non-profit organization that supports and advocates for victims of all types of crime. Founded in 1981, NCVC is the leading resource for information and assistance for victims of crime and their families.

a) How the NCVC Can Help Victims of Quid Pro Quo Harassment

The National Center for Victims of Crime (NCVC) offers confidential support, connects victims with resources, and helps them cope with the emotional aftermath of quid pro quo harassment. NCVC also promotes crime prevention, advocacy, and victim compensation, raising public awareness to address this issue effectively.

b) Contact Information

Victims of quid pro quo harassment can call the NCVC hotline at 1-800-FYI-CALL (1-800-394-2255) or chat with an NCVC advocate online for confidential support. NCVC’s hotline is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year. NCVC’s online chat service is available from 9 am to 5 pm ET, Monday through Friday.

Website URL: https://www.victimsofcrime.org

6. The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU)

What Is the ACLU? | History

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) is a non-profit organization that defends civil liberties and protects individual rights. Founded in 1920, the ACLU is the nation’s leading advocate for the rights of all people, regardless of race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, or disability.

a) How the ACLU Can Help Victims of Quid Pro Quo Harassment

The ACLU provides comprehensive legal and investigative support to victims of quid pro quo harassment. They also advocate for victims’ rights, educate the public, and work to change laws and policies to prevent future occurrences.

b) Contact Information

Victims of quid pro quo harassment can contact the ACLU for legal assistance and support. The ACLU has a nationwide network of offices and affiliates that can assist victims in their communities. You can find contact information for your local ACLU office or affiliate online at https://www.aclu.org/contact/.

Website URL: https://www.aclu.org

7. The National Employment Lawyers Association (NELA)

NELA: Creating A Better Future For Workers

The National Employment Lawyers Association (NELA) is a non-profit organization promoting employee rights and justice in the workplace. Founded in 1972, NELA is the leading national organization of attorneys representing employees in employment law matters.

a) How NELA Can Help Victims of Quid Pro Quo Harassment

NELA provides legal representation, research, strategic support, expert testimony, amicus briefs, public education, legislative advocacy, networking, and professional development resources and promotes ethical, legal practices to aid victims of quid pro quo harassment.

b) Contact Information

Victims of quid pro quo harassment can contact NELA for a referral to an employment lawyer in their area by calling 1-800-888-8227 or visiting the NELA website at https://www.nela.org/.

Website URL: https://www.nela.org/

8. The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM)

Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM)

The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) is a non-profit professional association dedicated to serving the needs of human resource (HR) professionals and advancing the HR profession. Founded in 1948, SHRM is the world’s largest HR professional association, representing over 300,000 members in 165 countries.

a) How SHRM Can Help Victims of Quid Pro Quo Harassment

SHRM assists employers in developing anti-harassment policies, conducting prevention training, establishing complaint procedures, fostering a respectful workplace culture, providing victim support, advocating for fair practices, conducting research, collaborating with other organizations, providing employee resources, and staying up-to-date on legal developments to prevent and address quid pro quo harassment effectively.

b) Contact Information

Victims of quid pro quo harassment can contact SHRM for information on how to report harassment to their employer and protect their rights by calling 1-800-377-4772 or visiting the SHRM website at https://www.shrm.org/.

Website URL: https://www.shrm.org/

9. The Association of Workplace Investigators (AWI)

The Association of Workplace Investigators (AWI) is a professional membership association dedicated to promoting and enhancing the quality of impartial workplace investigations. Founded in 2009, AWI has over 2,100 members internationally, including attorneys, human resource professionals, private investigators, and academics.

a) How AWI Can Help Victims of Quid Pro Quo Harassment

  • AWI can be a valuable resource for victims seeking a qualified workplace investigator.
  • AWI members are trained professionals who can conduct impartial investigations into harassment claims.
  • Victims can contact AWI for a referral to an investigator in their area.

b) Contact Information

Victims of quid pro quo harassment can contact AWI for a referral to a workplace investigator in their area by calling 1-800-AWI-HLP (1-800-294-4577) or visiting the AWI website at https://www.awi.org/.

Website URL: https://www.awi.org/

10. The National Employment Law Project (NELP)

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The National Employment Law Project (NELP) is a non-profit organization that advocates for the rights of low-wage workers. Founded in 1975, NELP is a national resource for information and action on workplace justice issues, focusing on low-wage and immigrant workers.

a) How NELP Can Help Victims of Quid Pro Quo Harassment

NELP provides legal, counseling, and financial assistance to victims of quid pro quo harassment. It also advocates for policy reform, conducts community outreach, supports employers, conducts research, collaborates with other organizations, provides online resources, and promotes ethical and legal practices to prevent and address quid pro quo harassment effectively.

b) Contact Information

Victims of quid pro quo harassment can seek legal assistance and support from NELP by calling 1-212-254-7328 or visiting the NELP website at https://www.nelp.org/.

Website URL: https://www.nelp.org/

11. The Equal Rights Advocates (ERA)

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The Equal Rights Advocates (ERA) is a non-profit organization that works to protect and expand economic and educational opportunities for women, girls, and LGBTQ people in the United States. Founded in 1972, ERA is one of the nation’s leading legal advocacy organizations for gender equality and LGBTQ rights.

a) How ERA Can Help Victims of Quid Pro Quo Harassment

ERA provides comprehensive legal, counseling, and advocacy support to victims of quid pro quo harassment while advocating for policy reforms, raising public awareness, and promoting workplace inclusivity.

b) Contact Information

Victims of quid pro quo harassment can contact ERA for legal assistance and support by calling 800-839-4ERA (4372) or visiting the ERA website at https://www.equalrights.org/.

Website URL: https://www.equalrights.org/

12. The Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC)

Morris Dees – Southern Poverty Law Center | American Freedom Stories | Biography

The Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) is a non-profit organization that monitors extremist groups and defends civil rights in the United States. Founded in 1971, the SPLC has a long history of fighting against hate and discrimination.

a) How the SPLC Can Help Victims of Quid Pro Quo Harassment

  • The SPLC can be a good resource for victims who believe their harassment is connected to hate speech or bias.
  • For general quid pro quo harassment, other resources on this list might be more suitable.

b) Contact Information

Victims of quid pro quo harassment can contact the SPLC for legal assistance and support by calling 1-800-689-4291 or visiting the SPLC website at https://www.splcenter.org/.

Website URL: https://www.splcenter.org/

13. Your Local Legal Aid organization

Legal aid organizations are non-profit organizations that provide free or low-cost legal services to low-income people. Various sources fund these organizations, including the government, foundations, and private donations.

a) How Legal Aid Can Help Victims of Quid Pro Quo Harassment

Legal aid provides free or low-cost legal representation, assistance with complaints, negotiation, court representation, legal advice, evidence gathering, protection from retaliation, emotional support referrals, public education, and advocacy for policy changes to help victims of quid pro quo harassment effectively.

II. Conclusion

Quid pro quo harassment is a serious form of sexual harassment that can have a devastating impact on victims. Many resources are available to help victims of quid pro quo harassment, including government agencies, non-profit organizations, and hotlines. If you have been a victim of quid pro quo harassment, it is important to seek help and support. You are not alone.

III. FAQs

1. What financial assistance options are available to victims of quid pro quo harassment to cover legal fees, therapy costs, and other expenses related to the harassment?

Victims of quid pro quo harassment may face financial burdens due to legal fees, therapy costs, and other expenses related to the harassment. Several financial assistance options are available to help them cover these expenses:

a) Legal Aid:

Legal aid organizations provide free or low-cost legal representation to low-income individuals, including victims of quid pro quo harassment. They can assist with filing complaints with the EEOC, negotiating settlements, and representing victims in court proceedings.

b) Victim Compensation Funds:

Some states have victim compensation funds that provide financial assistance to victims of crime, including quid pro quo harassment. These funds may cover legal fees, therapy costs, lost wages, and medical expenses.

c) Grants and Scholarships:

Various organizations offer grants and scholarships for victims of sexual harassment and assault. These funds can cover legal fees, therapy, education, and other related expenses.

d) Crowdfunding:

Crowdfunding platforms allow victims to raise money from friends, family, and the general public to cover expenses associated with quid pro quo harassment. This can be a viable option for those not qualifying for other financial assistance.

e) Employer Assistance Programs (EAPs):

Many employers offer EAPs that provide confidential counseling and support services to employees dealing with workplace issues, including quid pro quo harassment. These services may cover therapy costs or provide referrals to affordable therapists.

f) Government Assistance Programs:

Government programs such as Medicaid or Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) may provide financial assistance to low-income individuals, including victims of quid pro quo harassment. Eligibility criteria vary, so it’s crucial to check local requirements.

g) Community Resources:

Local community organizations may offer financial assistance or support services to victims of quid pro quo harassment. These organizations can provide referrals to relevant resources and help navigate seeking financial aid.

h) Debt Relief Options:

Victims of quid pro quo harassment may face increased debt due to legal fees or therapy costs. Exploring debt relief options, such as student loan forgiveness or debt consolidation programs, can help manage financial strain.

Remember, seeking financial assistance is crucial for victims of quid pro quo harassment to address the legal and emotional repercussions of the experience. These resources can help alleviate financial burdens and provide victims with the support they need to recover and move forward.

2. What are the best practices for victims of quid pro quo harassment to document and preserve Evidence of the harassment for potential legal action?

Documenting and preserving Evidence of quid pro quo harassment is crucial for victims to protect their rights and pursue legal action effectively. Here are some best practices for victims to follow:

  1. Gather Evidence Promptly: Start documenting Evidence immediately after the harassment occurs. Memories can fade over time, so capturing details promptly is important.
  2. Save All Relevant Communications: Save emails, text messages, voice recordings, and any other forms of communication that document the harassment. Include conversations with the harasser, witnesses, and your employer.
  3. Create a Detailed Log: Maintain a written or electronic log of each incident of harassment. Record the date, time, location, and specific details of what happened. Include the harasser’s actions, words, and any witnesses.
  4. Take Photographs or Videos: If possible, take photographs or videos of any physical evidence of the harassment, such as injuries, damaged property, or inappropriate workplace environments.
  5. Secure Witness Statements: Obtain written statements from witnesses to the harassment. Ask them to describe what they saw or heard and provide their contact information.
  6. Collect Supporting Documents: Gather any other relevant documents, such as performance reviews, disciplinary records, or company policies related to workplace harassment.
  7. Organize and Store Evidence: Organize and store all Evidence securely and confidentially. Use a locked box, password-protected files, or cloud storage with strong encryption.
  8. Seek Legal Advice: Consult with an attorney as soon as possible. They can advise you on the best practices for documenting Evidence and preserving your rights for potential legal action.

Documenting Evidence is essential for substantiating claims of quid pro quo harassment and seeking justice. By following these best practices, victims can protect their rights and hold perpetrators accountable.

3. What are the statute limitations for filing complaints or pursuing legal action against quid pro quo harassment, and how do they vary from state to state?

Statutes of limitations for filing complaints and pursuing legal action against quid pro quo harassment:

a) Filing Complaints with the EEOC

The statute of limitations for filing a complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) is typically 180 days from the date the harassment occurred. However, there are some exceptions to this rule. For example:

  • If you did not know about the harassment when it occurred, you may have an additional 180 days from the date you discovered it to file a complaint.
  • You have 90 days to file a complaint with the EEOC if you are a federal employee.
  • If you are a state or local government employee, the statute of limitations may differ, so you should check with local laws.
  • If you are an employee of a private employer, the statute of limitations may also be different, so you should check your company’s policies.
  • You can file a complaint with the EEOC online, by mail, or in person. The EEOC will investigate your complaint, and if it finds that you have been discriminated against, it will try to settle with your employer. If the EEOC cannot settle, it may issue you a right-to-sue letter, which allows you to file a lawsuit in court.

b) Pursuing Legal Action in Court

The statute of limitations for pursuing legal action in court against quid pro quo harassment typically varies from state to state. The statute of limitations is the time limit you must file a lawsuit.

It is important to consult with an attorney to determine your state’s applicable statute of limitations. An attorney can advise you on pursuing legal action against your employer.

c) Additional Considerations

There are a few additional things to keep in mind about the statutes of limitations for quid pro quo harassment:

  • The statute of limitations may be tolled (paused) if you are a minor or incapacitated.
  • The statute of limitations may be extended if you file a complaint with a state or local agency that enforces anti-discrimination laws.
  • The statute of limitations may be waived if your employer engages in fraudulent concealment of the harassment.

20 Long-Term Effects of Quid Pro Quo Harassment

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Junaid Khan

Junaid Khan is an expert on harassment laws since 2009. He is a passionate advocate for victims of harassment and works to educate the public about harassment laws and prevention. He is also a sought-after speaker on human resource management, relationships, parenting, and the importance of respecting others.

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